Just in time for Thanksgiving!

Posted By Jueri Svjagintsev on Nov 22, 2012


This design is about as simple as it gets, but I think the proportions came out very well. Something most people don't consider is that once a table is surrounded by an army of chairs any fancy legwork, pedestals, stretchers, etc are often hidden, but don't let that stop you!

 
This was my first experience with Sipo, (Entandrophragma utile), a mahogany look alike and it behaves like a good quality African Mahogany with the quarter sawn parts going very ribbony, other parts had a bit of pomelle figure. Here's a shot of the layout for the top, with paint thinner sloshed on it.
 
 
I used a different method for attaching the cross members by stitching them to the side rails with biscuits. I figure the 5 biscuits, which equal about ¾ inch in combined thickness, ought to do the job and is likely over-kill.
 
 
 
This was done as a sub-contract for another shop that I've worked with for years. Here's the completed table, minus a finish, so what you are seeing is thinner and some pretty heavily photoshopped images.
 
 

6 Comments

  1. Are we eating in the field?

  2. Well, that's where the turkeys are.

  3. I'm working on a project with wedged through tennons and hand cut dovetails and I appreciate the way you approached this table.  The working properties of the available glues today make it possible to make furniture which will last for generations without the need for joinery techniques made necessary by the working properties of glue available 100 years ago.  

  4. Good to hear from you Bill. Hey, if the glue is stronger than the wood, well, there you go. But there are always other factors, end grain absorption, movement etc. I do love the mechanical advantage of wedges though and I guess the Asians are probably the most brilliant makers of joints.

  5. There are mortise and tenons in the all important corners. The cute "juerified" joint are only on the cross members.

  6. Hey Mara, I saw a very nice glossy finish table that was the same design, with the aprons pulled out almost flush with the legs and a small overhang giving it a very different look.

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